How to easily remove many stains

How can I remove this stain?

I get asked this question so often!

And more often then not, I get asked not how to remove the stain or a stain but ‘remove stain’!

But it’s quite simple, really. The most important thing to know is that you can remove any stain off furniture, a dress, a tie or a couch if you dilute immediately with water and a little soap.

To remove (a) stain, you must act as quickly as possible!

Obviously sometimes it is not possible to remove the stain immediately because we did not notice that a shirt, jacket, carpet or seat of a car was soiled or because we didn’t have time to remove this stain. The worst thing to do in these cases, when the stain is dry, is to lose your temper and pour any old removal agent on the stain.

How, then, can I remove a stain?

If you want to remove a stain, there is a simple rule to remember: do not pour the removal agent onto the stain! But pour the removal agent, in small amounts, on a clean, white cloth, and, once the cloth is dampened, dab the stain, working always from outside in.

TIPS & TRICKS

My trick to remove almost all stains
If the stain is on clothing or bed linen, rub the stain (any stain) with a slightly moist natural soap bar to form a sort of crust. Let stand an hour and then lather and rinse before laundering. You will notice the stain is gone! It is miraculous!

If the stain is thick, pasty or solid, to remove it, before dabbing it, scrape it gently with the edge of a spoon, then and only then, remove the stain. Never use a knife or anything sharp that could dangerously damage the fabric, wood or leather.

If the stain is liquid, blot before removing the stain, to avoid spreading it.

Once the stain is removed, always remember to rinse and dab the area to eliminate the removal agent.

Which removal agent should I use?

Each stain should be treated differently, but generally speaking, when removing a stain, this is what you need to know:

Remove a grease stain (butter, oil, margarine, grease or gasoline):

Dab the stain with a cloth dampened with diluted ammonia. Dilution depends on the leather or fabric. Test your ammonia solution on a hidden part of the leather or fabric and check if it is altered by your solution or if the fabric colour has stained the cloth you’re dabbing with. If so, dilute the ammonia further. Repeat until your solution does not alter the leather or fabric.

Remove an oxidizable stain (wine, fruit, tea or coffee) or chemical stain (ink, dye or iodine)

Dab the stain with a cloth dampened with diluted white vinegar, lemon juice or surgical spirit. Test your solution on a hidden part of the leather or fabric and check if it is altered by your solution or if the fabric colour has stained the cloth you’re dabbing with. If so, dilute your solution further. Repeat until your solution does not alter the leather or fabric.

Remove an enzymatic stain (blood, grass, milk or egg)

Clean the stain using either diluted hydrogen peroxide or the bleach. Test your solution on a hidden part of the leather or fabric and check if it is altered by your solution or if the fabric colour has stained the cloth you’re dabbing with. If so, dilute your solution further. Repeat until your solution does not alter the leather or fabric.

Remove a metallic stain (rust or verdigris).

The exception to the rule! On these stains you directly pour rust remover on the soiled fabric, or even on linoleum, marble or wood.

Remove a coloured grease stain (lipstick, makeup or wax)

Dab make up stains with non greasy make up remover.

Dab wax stains

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